Credit Hours Under a Flexible Work Schedule Part 4

Credit Hours Under a Flexible Work Schedule Part 4

Credit Hours Under a Flexible Work Schedule Part 4

No overtime pay or compensatory time off may be paid when employees earn credit hours or when credit hours are liquidated because Federal employment ends. (See 5 U.S.C. 6123(b) and 6126.)

No night pay may be paid when credit hours are earned. That is because when employees earn credit hours, they are not performing regularly scheduled work. By contrast, night pay is authorized for work performed at night during an employees regularly scheduled tour of duty. See 5 U.S.C. 5545(a).

No night pay may be paid for credit hours that are used at night to be absent from the employees basic tour of duty. This is because under 5 U.S.C. 5545(a) and OPM regulations, employees must generally perform work at night to earn night pay. There is no provision of law or OPM regulations that permits night pay to be paid when credit hours are used to be absent from regularly scheduled nightwork.

For requirements on entitlement to night differential when credit hours are earned by wage (prevailing rate) employees and employees employed under title 38, United States Code, see 5 U.S.C. 6123(c)(2).

No. Credit hours may be earned only when employees work voluntarily, with supervisory approval, in excess of their regularly scheduled basic work requirement. Sunday premium pay is paid only when full-time employees are required to work during a Sunday tour of duty that is part of their regularly scheduled basic work requirement. Sunday premium pay is limited to 8 hours for each regularly scheduled basic tour of duty that begins or ends on Sunday. Thus, Sunday premium pay may not be paid when employees earn credit hours.

Also, employees may not receive Sunday premium pay if they are permitted to use credit hours in order to be absent from their regularly scheduled basic work requirement on a Sunday. Employees may not receive Sunday premium pay for any period of time when they do not actually perform work on Sunday. (See Section 624 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 1999, which is a permanent restriction.)

When a GS employee performs work during any part of a day for which hazardous duty pay is authorized, the employee is entitled to hazardous duty pay for all hours in a pay status on that day. (See 5 CFR 550.905). This means that if an employee is entitled to hazardous duty pay during any part of a day when credit hours are earned or used, the employee must be paid hazardous duty pay for the credit hours as well. Subject to the provisions of any applicable negotiated agreement, an agency may establish a policy that employees cannot earn and/or use credit hours on any day when the employee is entitled to hazardous duty pay.

No. Excused absence means that employees are excused from their basic work requirement on that day. As explained in the answer to the first question above, credit hours are hours worked voluntarily by employees in excess of the their basic work requirement, with supervisory approval.

If employees work during the hours of their basic work requirement despite having been excused from work, they are not entitled to any additional compensation or to credit hours. However, if permitted by agency policies or negotiated agreements, supervisors may approve requests from employees under flexible work schedules to earn credit hours for work in excess of their basic work requirement on a day when excused absence is granted.

Employees may not earn any additional compensation or credit hours for working voluntarily during holiday hours. If permitted by agency policies or negotiated agreements, supervisors may approve requests from employees under flexible work schedules to earn credit hours for work in excess of their basic work requirement on a holiday.

Full-time employees under flexible work schedules are excused only from 8 hours of their basic work requirement because of a holiday. (See 5 U.S.C. 6124.) Therefore, an agency may find it desirable to schedule only 8 hours of an employees basic work requirement on a holiday. Flexible work schedules may be changed to accommodate this policy. If an employee is scheduled to complete 9 or 10 hours of his or her basic work requirement on a holiday, the agency may permit the employee to use previously accrued credit hours or annual leave in order to be absent with pay during the 9th and 10th hours.

If employees under flexible work schedules are required by an agency to work during holiday hours (their basic work requirement if not for the holiday), they are entitled to holiday premium pay for a maximum of 8 hours.

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